The term Peripatetic refers most properly to a philosopher or student of philosophy of the Aristotelian school of thought; so called because Aristotle's habit was to instruct his students while walking around (peripateo) the groves in Athens immediately outside his school (Lyceum).

However, the term can also be applied to anyone of a philosophic bent, provided that they are walking about. So, the next time you feel like wandering aimlessly around the lecture hall, just tell your professor that you're feeling a little Peripatetic today. I'm sure he'll understand.

Per`i*pa*tet"ic (?), a. [L. peripateticus, Gr. , fr. to walk about; about + to walk: cf. F. p'eripat'etique.]

1.

Walking about; itinerant.

2.

Of or pertaining to the philosophy taught by Aristotle (who gave his instructions while walking in the Lyceum at Athens), or to his followers.

"The true peripatetic school."

Howell.

 

© Webster 1913.


Per`i*pa*tet"ic, n.

1.

One who walks about; a pedestrian; an itinerant.

Tatler.

2.

A disciple of Aristotle; an Aristotelian.

 

© Webster 1913.

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