In"ward (?), a. [AS. inweard, inneweard, innanweard, fr. innan, inne, within (fr. in in; see In) + the suffix -weard, E. -ward.]

1.

Being or placed within; inner; interior; -- opposed to outward.

Milton.

2.

Seated in the mind, heart, spirit, or soul.

"Inward beauty."

Shak.

3.

Intimate; domestic; private.

[Obs.]

All my inward friends abhorred me. Job xix. 19.

He had had occasion, by one very inward with him, to know in part the discourse of his life. Sir P. Sidney.

 

© Webster 1913.


In"ward, n.

1.

That which is inward or within; especially, in the plural, the inner parts or organs of the body; the viscera.

Jer. Taylor.

Then sacrificing, laid the inwards and their fat. Milton.

2.

The mental faculties; -- usually pl.

[Obs.]

3.

An intimate or familiar friend or acquaintance.

[Obs.] "I was an inward of his."

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


In"ward (?), In"wards (?), adv. [AS. inweard. The ending -s is prop. a genitive ending. See Inward, a., -wards.]

1.

Toward the inside; toward the center or interior; as, to bend a thing inward.

2.

Into, or toward, the mind or thoughts; inwardly; as, to turn the attention inward.

So much the rather, thou Celestial Light, Shine inward. Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.

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