• RimRod was wound so tight that I had to wound him with my Sword of Zoloft.
  • I had to object to the object which Randofu was forcing into the strange young man.
  • donfreenut's toilet was so full that it was forced to refuse the incoming refuse.
  • As a Eastern European hooker, witchiepoo had to polish a lot of Polish knobs.
  • dem bones could lead if he would get the lead out of his ass.

These are not homophones. A homophone is a word pronounced the same as another but which has a different meaning. An example would be heir and air.

These are not homonyms. A homonym is a word which is the same as another word in sound and spelling but which has a different meaning. An example would be to chase, as in pursue, and chase, as in "to ornament metal".

Some might call these homographs. A homograph is a word which has the same written form as another but which has a different meaning and usually a different origin. It doesn't matter if they are pronounced the same way or not.

A better term is heteronym. This is a word which is spelled the same as another but which has a different sound as well as a different meaning.

In the witchiepoo example, polish is also a capitonym. This is a word which changes pronunciation when it is capitalized. Another example of this would be:

  • The editor's job here on E2 will often make one feel like Job on a bad day.

Het"er*o*nym (?), n.

That which is heteronymous; a thing having a different name or designation from some other thing; -- opposed to homonym.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.