A fun game, wherein young children are taught about the horrible consequences for ignorance in the strict, intellectual society in present-day America. In the game, the player has to figure out a secret word or phrase, given only the number of letters it has, and sometimes the category under which it falls. For example, if the secret phrase were hangman, they would see only -------, and possibly told that the category was fun games. Then, the player(s) have to guess the letters in the word, one at a time. For each letter guessed, if it is part of the phrase, then all the occurences of the letter are written in; if they guessed a, they would now see -a---a-.

However, if they guess wrong, each wrong guess results in part of the gallows being built. When the gallows are finished, each wrong guess results in the materialization of a single part of an innocent man inside the gallows, with a noose around his neck. When his entire body has appeared, its weight pulls the noose tightly around his neck to the point where he either suffocates, or his neck snaps. In either case, the man dies, and, even worse, the player fails to earn a point for that round.

However, if the entire puzzle is solved before the man materializes, he is set free and the player gets a point. A dead man or a point gained constitutes the end of a single round. The winner of the game, after a number of such rounds, is the one with the most points, and thus the least dead people on his or her conscience.

The best way to win at Hangman is to use the most common letters first. These are "e t a o i n s r h d l u" in that order.

Hang"man (?), n.; pl. Hangmen().

One who hangs another; esp., one who makes a business of hanging; a public executioner; -- sometimes used as a term of reproach, without reference to office.

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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