Drawing Room Dances by Henri Cellarius Chapter 15
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XV.
THE WALTZE-MAZURKA, CALLED THE CELLARIUS.

I shall conclude what I have to say of the mazurka by giving the explanation of a waltze that I composed at a time when the taste for this dance was beginning to spread in France.

It appeared to me that the step of the mazurka was adapted also to the waltze, and that by mingling other steps with it, but always in the character of the dance, it would be possible to compose a waltze of a perfectly novel kind, which might be executed at times, when the company was not numerous enough to form a complete mazurka. This waltze might also be advantageously introduced amongst the cotillons, when the approach of the conclusion renders a more animated movement almost indispensable to the dancers.

My pupils would have this waltze called after me, and have named it the Cellarius. I had no choice but with all humility to accept this honour; to have declined it would, I think, have been on my part much more an affectation than an act of modesty. But it may be supposed that I am not going to discuss the more or less merit of the Cellarius, nor to dwell upon the flattering reception it has met with in France and England. By a double reason of propriety, I feel myself bound here more than ever to strictly limit myself to a simple notice of the step and character of this waltze.

The mazurka-waltze consists of three distinct parts, which are executed at discretion. To the first I have given the name of simple waltze; to the second that of coup de talon; and to the third that of the double waltze.

The dancer faces his partner as for the ordinary waltze. The beginning is made with the left foot by a sliding step, and by sliding to the second position. You then pirouette, springing on the left foot, and raising the right to recommence with this leg. This is for the first part.

The second part is performed by means of the beat of the heel, which I have already explained in the article on the mazurka. You then lengthen a side step without turning to recommence with the other leg. This step is made four times with one foot, and four times with the other.

For the third part, you execute the two pas de deport, that I have pointed out in the first. After the second step, when the left leg is in air, and you are on the extreme end of the foot, you give at the conclusion of the bar a coup de talon, short and well marked in chassant the right leg to the side, to recommence with the same.

The first part of this waltze is executed to the right, to the left, in advance and backwards, the same as with the polka.

The waltzer must necessarily possess all the capabilities required by the mazurka—suppleness of body, flexibility of movement, and limbs pliant, yet endowed with a certain vigour.

The mazurka-waltze may be danced to all the airs of the mazurka, only the orchestra must take a more animated movement, and well emphasize the attack of every bar.


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Drawing Room Dances by Henri Cellarius Chapter 15

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