I remember someone asserting that the current omnipresence of porn in our society would, as a result, make women's sexuality appear much more valuable to them than it would in an otherwise less sexually open environment. I don't necessarily agree with it, but I find the point interesting. Indeed, women need an incentive to 'commit' sex. If she knows she can have it .. she won't. Lemme rephrase this as it's rather obscure this way. According to Dangerous Men, Adventurous Women, women want CHALLENGE. This is a direct consequence of the social psychology concept of social proof, among others.

I think that women's sexuality is more valuable to women in modern Western society than it was in say, Victorian/Gilded Age society, but not particularly because of porn. Women's sexuality is more valuable to women now because we're aware that being sexual has benefits (pleasure) for us, whereas at that time the prevailing society insisted that sexuality was valuable only as a method of achieving motherhood, and using it for any other purpose was a good way to wind up at best considered "fast", quite likely called "ruined" or "fallen."

The beginnings of the Sexual Revolution (probably early 1960s; Helen Gurley Brown's Sex And The Single Girl came out in 1962) predate the era of porn being chic or even all that big a business (say, when Deep Throat and Behind the Green Door came out in 1972) and probably pornography's wide availability is a direct consequence of the fact that sexual mores were already quite changed from their state fifty years earlier.

I was introduced to porn by a friend in Junior High School. And it was interesting, in video and magazine format, for about a year.

After that, it became more and more a thing of bodies doing repetitive, stupid human tricks on camera.

I find that for the most part, porn wants us to believe that sex, in and of itself, is terribly attractive to people who suffer from an extreme lack of character development.

Whenever I have occasion to see pictures or films these days, I find myself asking, "what is this person really like? What are her dreams? Did she always think she'd wind up here?" Questions which are far more interesting, generally, then how many cocks she's taking at once.

Because frankly, once you've seen a certain number of bodies doing the same techniques a certain number of times...you've seen it all. And the true thrill, after all, to The Real Thing, is that connection between two people, the taste, the smell, etc. But especially that connection. And most porn seems to go out of it's way to avoid creating that.


Having totally lost track of my own point, I now return to the scene of the crime.

I think that the question of whether or not porn increases the value of pussy, or in fact degrades women, or makes them unnecessary due to the value of a film and a warm hand, is a highly relative one, one which is borne by the individual rather than society as a whole.

Some men can take in enormous quantities of porn and be relatively unaffected, others become addicted and require greater and greater amounts of input to satisfy their libidos. Myself, I've gotten to the point where the female body is quite lovely to look at, but no longer terribly arousing. So on one hand the relative value of pussy on a merely "as I find it" basis is rather low, currently. On the other hand, the value of pussy in the context of personality, relationships, etc. is quite high for me...in fact, the knowing of that person has become far more important and arousing than any movie, no matter how graphic.

I think that a precaution that must be taken with porn, as with everything else, is to avoid overdoing it. Vast intakes of anything will dull your senses to that medium, and yet we are certainly a consumer culture.

I would venture that the problem of pussy value is not significant only to pussy, but rather relative across the board to a number of significant cultural factors.

I've realized that the best culimation of this idea is to be found in Neil Gaimain's introduction to his story, "Looking For The Girl", sums it up best:

    "To research the story, I sat in the Penthouse U.K. Docklands office and thumbed through 20 years of bound magazines...it occured to me, while I was looking at two decades of Penthouses, that Penthouse and magazines like it had absolutely nothing to do with women and absolutely everything to do with photographs of women..."

(This node has five other write-ups, all cooled, including several only a few sentences long. See and vote for yourself)

Images of women as sexual objects are pervasive in many cultures - and not just in what most people term pornography. There are a number of separate questions here, which should not be confused.

Does pornography increase the sense of self worth of women by adding sexual value to them while not detracting to their other social roles? Almost certainly not. Most pornography features women who need not be treated with respect to be sexually available.

Does pornography increase the sense of a woman that it is a few particular portions of her anatomy that make her important, unlike men who can achieve in many different ways? Perhaps, although pornography is more viewed by men than women, so perhaps it has little impact on the 'self-perceived value of pussy'. On the other hand, movies and television show many things that would have been considered pornography a few years ago.

Does pornography decrease the sense of their own value of women, by indicating they are valuable for one primary reason and do not deserve to be treated with respect for that one reason? It's hard to say, but very few women seem to think more of themselves because their sex is so prominently featured in pornography.

Does pornography lead women to overestimate men's sexual interest in them? Probably not for most women, since it also places a premium on anatomical qualities which are difficult to achieve with time, money, and the help of a cameraman. It may well lead them to misunderstand men's priorities - or to understand the priorities of some men better.

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