Cheap (?), n. [AS. ce�xa0;p bargain, sale, price; akin to D. Koop purchase, G. Kauf, ICel. kaup bargain. Cf. Cheapen, Chapman, Chaffer, Cope, v. i.]

A bargain; a purchase; cheapness.

[Obs.]

The sack that thou hast drunk me would have bought me lights as good cheap at the dearest chandler's in Europe. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Cheap, a. [Abbrev. fr. "good cheap": a good purchase or bargain; cf. F. bon march'e, a bon march'e. See Cheap, n., Cheapen.]

1.

Having a low price in market; of small cost or price, as compared with the usual price or the real value.

Where there are a great sellers to a few buyers, there the thing to be sold will be cheap. Locke.

2.

Of comparatively small value; common; mean.

You grow cheap in every subject's eye. Dryden.

Dog cheap, very cheap, -- a phrase formed probably by the catachrestical transposition of good cheap. [Colloq.]<-- = dirt cheap?-->

 

© Webster 1913.


Cheap, adv.

Cheaply.

Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Cheap, v. i.

To buy; to bargain.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.

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