Treat (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Treated; p. pr. & vb. n. Treating.] [OE. treten, OF. traitier, F. traiter, from L. tractare to draw violently, to handle, manage, treat, v. intens. from trahere, tractum, to draw. See Trace, v. t., and cf. Entreat, Retreat, Trait.]

1.

To handle; to manage; to use; to bear one's self toward; as, to treat prisoners cruelly; to treat children kindly.

2.

To discourse on; to handle in a particular manner, in writing or speaking; as, to treat a subject diffusely.

3.

To entertain with food or drink, especially the latter, as a compliment, or as an expression of friendship or regard; as, to treat the whole company.

4.

To negotiate; to settle; to make terms for.

[Obs.]

To treat the peace, a hundred senators Shall be commissioned. Dryden.

5. Med.

To care for medicinally or surgically; to manage in the use of remedies or appliances; as, to treat a disease, a wound, or a patient.

6.

To subject to some action; to apply something to; as, to treat a substance with sulphuric acid.

Ure.

7.

To entreat; to beseech.

[Obs.]

Ld. Berners.

 

© Webster 1913.


Treat (?), v. i.

1.

To discourse; to handle a subject in writing or speaking; to make discussion; -- usually with of; as, Cicero treats of old age and of duties.

And, shortly of this story for to treat. Chaucer.

Now of love they treat. Milton.

2.

To negotiate; to come to terms of accommodation; -- often followed by with; as, envoys were appointed to treat with France.

Inform us, will the emperor treat! Swift.

3.

To give a gratuitous entertainment, esp. of food or drink, as a compliment.

 

© Webster 1913.


Treat, n.

1.

A parley; a conference.

[Obs.]

Bid him battle without further treat. Spenser.

2.

An entertainment given as an expression of regard.

3.

That which affords entertainment; a gratification; a satisfaction; as, the concert was a rich treat.

 

© Webster 1913.

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