Shove (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shoved (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Shoving.] [OE. shoven, AS. scofian, fr. scfan; akin to OFries. skva, D. schuiven, G. schieben, OHG. scioban, Icel. skfa, skfa, Sw. skuffa, Dan. skuffe, Goth. afskiuban to put away, cast away; cf. Skr. kshubh to become agitated, to quake, Lith. skubrus quick, skubinti to hasten. &root;160. Cf. Sheaf a bundle of stalks, Scoop, Scuffle.]

1.

To drive along by the direct and continuous application of strength; to push; especially, to push (a body) so as to make it move along the surface of another body; as, to shove a boat on the water; to shove a table across the floor.

2.

To push along, aside, or away, in a careless or rude manner; to jostle.

And shove away the worthy bidden guest. Milton.

He used to shove and elbow his fellow servants. Arbuthnot.

 

© Webster 1913.


Shove, v. i.

1.

To push or drive forward; to move onward by pushing or jostling.

2.

To move off or along by an act pushing, as with an oar a pole used by one in a boat; sometimes with off.

He grasped the oar,< eceived his guests on board, and shoved from shore. Garth.

 

© Webster 1913.


Shove (?), n.

The act of shoving; a forcible push.

I rested . . . and then gave the boat another shove. Swift.

Syn. -- See Thrust.

 

© Webster 1913.


Shove, obs.

p. p. of Shove.

Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.

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