Shack (?), v. t. [Prov. E., to shake, to shed. See Shake.]

1.

To shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest. [Prov. Eng.] Grose.

2.

To feed in stubble, or upon waste corn. [Prov. Eng.]

3.

To wander as a vagabond or a tramp. [Prev.Eng.]

 

© Webster 1913


Shack, n. [Cf. Scot. shag refuse of barley or oats.]

1.

The grain left after harvest or gleaning; also, nuts which have fallen to the ground. [Prov. Eng.]

2.

Liberty of winter pasturage. [Prov. Eng.]

3.

A shiftless fellow; a low, itinerant beggar; a vagabond; a tramp. [Prov. Eng. & Colloq. U.S.] Forby.

All the poor old shacks about the town found a friend in Deacon Marble.
H. W. Beecher.

Common of shack (Eng.Law), the right of persons occupying lands lying together in the same common field to turn out their cattle to range in it after harvest. Cowell.

 

© Webster 1913


Shack, n. [Cf. Shack, v. i.]

A hut; a shanty; a cabin. [Colloq.]

These miserable shacks are so low that their occupants cannot stand erect.
D. C. Worcester.

 

© Webster 1913

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.