Scald (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scaled; p. pr. & vb. n. Scalding.] [OF. eschalder, eschauder, escauder, F. 'echauder, fr. L. excaldare; ex + caldus, calidus, warm, hot. See Ex, and Calderon.]

1.

To burn with hot liquid or steam; to pain or injure by contact with, or imersion in, any hot fluid; as, to scald the hand.

Mine own tears Do scald like molten lead. Shak.

Here the blue flames of scalding brimstone fall. Cowley.

2.

To expose to a boiling or violent heat over a fire, or in hot water or other liquor; as, to scald milk or meat.

 

© Webster 1913.


Scald, n.

A burn, or injury to the skin or flesh, by some hot liquid, or by steam.

 

© Webster 1913.


Scald, a. [For scalled. See Scall.]

1.

Affected with the scab; scaby.

Shak.

2.

Scurry; paltry; as, scald rhymers.

[Obs.]

Shak.

Scald crow Zool., the hooded crow. [Ireland] -- Scald head Med., a name popularly given to several diseases of the scalp characterized by pustules (the dried discharge of which forms scales) and by falling out of the hair.

 

© Webster 1913.


Scald, n.

Scurf on the head. See Scall.

Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.


Scald [Icel. skald.]

One of the ancient Scandinavian poets and historiographers; a reciter and singer of heroic poems, etc., among the Norsemen; more rarely, a bard of any of the ancient Teutonic tribes.

[Written also skald.]

A war song such as was of yore chanted on the field of battle by the scalds of the yet heathen Saxons. Sir W. Scott.

 

© Webster 1913.

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