Re*cruit" (r?*kr?t"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Recruited; p. pr. & vb. n. Recruiting.] [F. recruter, corrupted (under influence of recrue recruiting, recruit, from recrotre, p.p. recr, to grow again) from an older recluter, properly, to patch, to mend (a garment); pref. re- + OF. clut piece, piece of cloth; cf. Icel. klt kerchief, E. clout.]

1.

To repair by fresh supplies, as anything wasted; to remedy lack or deficiency in; as, food recruits the flesh; fresh air and exercise recruit the spirits.

Her cheeks glow the brighter, recruiting their color. Glanvill.

2.

Hence, to restore the wasted vigor of; to renew in strength or health; to reinvigorate.

3.

To supply with new men, as an army; to fill up or make up by enlistment; as, he recruited two regiments; the army was recruited for a campaign; also, to muster; to enlist; as, he recruited fifty men.

M. Arnold.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*cruit", v. i.

1.

To gain new supplies of anything wasted; to gain health, flesh, spirits, or the like; to recuperate; as, lean cattle recruit in fresh pastures.

2.

To gain new supplies of men for military or other service; to raise or enlist new soldiers; to enlist troops.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*cruit", n.

1.

A supply of anything wasted or exhausted; a reenforcement.

The state is to have recruits to its strength, and remedies to its distempers. Burke.

2.

Specifically, a man enlisted for service in the army; a newly enlisted soldier.

 

© Webster 1913.

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