All text written coherently which is not poetry. all is prose. Novels contain prose, and can be said to be prosaic. Instruction manuals are written in prose. Most people speak in prose. People tend to speak in poetry when they're in love, when they're depressed, or when they're either drunk or stoned. Exceptions to this are philosophers, rock stars and Muhammad Ali.

Prose (?), n. [F. prose, L. prosa, fr. prorsus, prosus, straight forward, straight on, for proversus; pro forward + versus, p. p. of vertere to turn. See Verse.]

1.

The ordinary language of men in speaking or writing; language not cast in poetical measure or rhythm; -- contradistinguished from verse, or metrical composition.

I speak in prose, and let him rymes make. Chaucer.

Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme. Milton.

I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry, that is; prose -- words in their best order; poetry -- the best order. Coleridge.

2.

Hence, language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.

3. R. C. Ch.

A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass. See Sequence.

 

© Webster 1913.


Prose, a.

1.

Pertaining to, or composed of, prose; not in verse; as, prose composition.

2.

Possessing or exhibiting unpoetical characteristics; plain; dull; prosaic; as, the prose duties of life.

 

© Webster 1913.


Prose, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Prosed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Prosing.]

1.

To write in prose.

2.

To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.

 

© Webster 1913.


Prose, v. i.

1.

To write prose.

Prosing or versing, but chiefly this latter. Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.

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