Pro*found", a. [F. profond, L. profundus; pro before, forward + fundus the bottom. See Found to establish, Bottom lowest part.]

1.

Descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to a great depth; deep.

"A gulf profound."

Milton.

2.

Intellectually deep; entering far into subjects; reaching to the bottom of a matter, or of a branch of learning; thorough; as, a profound investigation or treatise; a profound scholar; profound wisdom.

3.

Characterized by intensity; deeply felt; pervading; overmastering; far-reaching; strongly impressed; as, a profound sleep.

"Profound sciatica."

Shak.

Of the profound corruption of this class there can be no doubt. Milman.

4.

Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep humility; lowly; submissive; as, a profound bow.

What humble gestures! What profound reverence! Dupp.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pro*found" (?), n.

1.

The deep; the sea; the ocean.

God in the fathomless profound Hath all this choice commanders drowned. Sandys.

2.

An abyss.

Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pro*found", v. t.

To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.

[Obs.]

Sir T. Browne.

 

© Webster 1913.


Pro*found", v. i.

To dive deeply; to penetrate.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.

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