A slang term used a lot by hardcore computer gamers, elite warez dudez and wannabe hackers to indicate either something that is very, very good or total domination or total control of something. For instance: The railgun owns!, I could own you., or simply 0wned

For the most part the word, albeit good, is horribly overused, and has spread to a degree into everyday language. Occasionally it creeps into geek vocabulary.

Humorous offshoots include rented, borrowed and ten month reducing interest loan.

Closely linked to words such as sp0wned/spowned (spoon + owned) and denied.

Own (?), v. t. [OE. unnen to grant, permit, be pleased with, AS. unnan to grant; akin to OS. giunnan, G. gonnen, Icel. unna; of uncertain origin. This word has been confused with own to possess.]

To grant; to acknowledge; to admit to be true; to confess; to recognize in a particular character; as, we own that we have forfeited your love.

The wakeful bloodhound rose, and shook his hide But his sagacious eye an inmate owns. Keats.

 

© Webster 1913.


Own, a. [OE. owen, awen, auen, aughen, AS. agen, p. p. of agan to possess; akin to OS. &emac;gan, G. & D. eigen, Icel. eiginn, Sw. & Dan. egen. &root;110. See Owe.]

Belonging to; belonging exclusively or especially to; peculiar; -- most frequently following a possessive pronoun, as my, our, thy, your, his, her, its, their, in order to emphasize or intensify the idea of property, peculiar interest, or exclusive ownership; as, my own father; my own composition; my own idea; at my own price.

"No man was his own [i. e., no man was master of himself, or in possession of his senses]."

Shak.

To hold one's own, to keep or maintain one's possessions; to yield nothing; esp., to suffer no loss or disadvantage in a contest.

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Own, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Owned (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Owning.] [OE. ohnien, ahnien, AS. agnian, fr. agen own, a. See Own, a.]

To hold as property; to have a legal or rightful title to; to be the proprietor or possessor of; to possess; as, to own a house.

 

© Webster 1913.

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