In UNIX, one of the intercommunication commands available to the user is mail. To use mail:


Format:
 mail -(switch) (argument)

Switches:
 
 -d   Start debugging output
 -e   Check for mail
 -F   Put the message in a file. The name of the file is
      the name of the first recipient
 -H   Print only the header information
 -I   Ignore any interrupts
 -n   Do not initialize from the mail.rc file
 -N   Do not print the header information
 -U   Convert UUCP to Internet addresses
 -v   Pass the -v flag to sendmail

 -f (filename)   Read messages from (filename) instead
                 of the mailbox.
 -f (folder)     Use file named (folder) in a directory
                 called (folder).
 -h (number)     Checks the hops made. Kills infinite
                 delivery loops.
 -r (address)    Pass the (address) argument to the
                 MTA or network delivery software.
 -s (subject)    Replace the subject header field with
                 the new (subject).
 -T (file)       Prints the article-ID of all messages
                 on (file).
 -u (username)   Allows you to read (username)'s mailbox
                 contents. You must have the proper 
                 permissions in that user's home directory.

Note: Anything in parenthesis should be replaced, such
      as (filename) to bigfile.log (note no parenthesis).

Incoming mail is stored in the system mailbox. After you open a mail message, it gets placed in the mbox in your home directory.

To follow up on Rancid_Pickle's writeup, it is important in the case sensitive UN*X world to distinguish between mail and Mail, which are completely different programs. Mail is sometimes known as mailx, of course, but we all know the difference between Mail and mail, right, children?

Mail (?), n.

A spot.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Mail, n. [F. maille, OF. also maaille, LL. medalia. See Medal.]

1.

A small piece of money; especially, an English silver half-penny of the time of Henry V.

[Obs.] [Written also maile, and maille.]

2.

Rent; tribute.

[Obs., except in certain compounds and phrases, as blackmail, mails and duties, etc.]

Mail and duties ScotsLaw, the rents of an estate, in whatever form paid.

 

© Webster 1913.


Mail, n. [OE. maile, maille, F. maille a ring of mail, mesh, network, a coat of mail, fr. L. macula spot, a mesh of a net. Cf. Macle, Macula, Mascle.]

1.

A flexible fabric made of metal rings interlinked. It was used especially for defensive armor.

Chaucer.

Chain mail, Coat of mail. See under Chain, and Coat.

2.

Hence generally, armor, or any defensive covering.

3. Naut.

A contrivance of interlinked rings, for rubbing off the loose hemp on lines and white cordage.

4. Zool.

Any hard protective covering of an animal, as the scales and plates of reptiles, shell of a lobster, etc.

We . . . strip the lobster of his scarlet mail. Gay.

 

© Webster 1913.


Mail, v. t.

1.

To arm with mail.

2.

To pinion.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Mail, n. [OE. male bag, OF. male, F. malle bag, trunk, mail, OHG. malaha, malha, wallet; akin to D. maal, male; cf. Gael. & Ir. mala, Gr. hide, skin.]

1.

A bag; a wallet.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

2.

The bag or bags with the letters, papers, papers, or other matter contained therein, conveyed under public authority from one post office to another; the whole system of appliances used by government in the conveyance and delivery of mail matter.

There is a mail come in to-day, with letters dated Hague. Tatler.

3.

That which comes in the mail; letters, etc., received through the post office.

4.

A trunk, box, or bag, in which clothing, etc., may be carried.

[Obs.]

Sir W. Scott.

Mail bag, a bag in which mailed matter is conveyed under public authority. -- Mail boat, a boat that carries the mail. -- Mail catcher, an iron rod, or other contrivance, attached to a railroad car for catching a mail bag while the train is in motion. -- Mail guard, an officer whose duty it is to guard the public mails. [Eng.] -- Mail train, a railroad train carrying the mail.

 

© Webster 1913.


Mail, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mailed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Mailing.]

To deliver into the custody of the postoffice officials, or place in a government letter box, for transmission by mail; to post; as, to mail a letter.

[U. S.]

⇒ In the United States to mail and to post are both in common use; as, to mail or post a letter. In England post is the commoner usage.

 

© Webster 1913.

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