Lure (?), n. [OF. loire, loirre, loerre, F. leurre lure, decoy; of German origin; cf. MHG. luoder, G. luder lure, carrion.]

1.

A contrivance somewhat resembling a bird, and often baited with raw meat; -- used by falconers in recalling hawks.

Shak.

2.

Any enticement; that which invites by the prospect of advantage or pleasure; a decoy.

Milton.

3. Hat Making

A velvet smoothing brush.

Knight.

 

© Webster 1913.


Lure, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lured (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Luring.] [OF. loirer, loirier, F. leurrer. See Lure, n.]

To draw to the lure; hence, to allure or invite by means of anything that promises pleasure or advantage; to entice; to attract.

I am not lured with love. Piers Plowman.

And various science lures the learned eye. Gay.

 

© Webster 1913.


Lure, v. i.

To recall a hawk or other animal.

 

© Webster 1913.

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