To throw up, or release large amounts of partially digested food from the mouth. Usually done when something extremely disgusting is presented to someone.

Hurl (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hurled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Hurling.] [OE. hurlen, hourlen; prob. contracted fr. OE. hurtlen to hurtle, or probably akin to E. whirl. &root;16. See Hurtle.]

1.

To send whirling or whizzing through the air; to throw with violence; to drive with great force; as, to hurl a stone or lance.

And hurl'd them headlong to their fleet and main. Pope.

2.

To emit or utter with vehemence or impetuosity; as, to hurl charges or invective.

Spenser.

3. [Cf. Whirl.]

To twist or turn.

"Hurled or crooked feet." [Obs.]

Fuller.

 

© Webster 1913.


Hurl, v. i.

1.

To hurl one's self; to go quickly.

[R.]

2.

To perform the act of hurling something; to throw something (at another).

God shall hurl at him and not spare. Job xxvii. 22 (Rev. Ver. ).

3.

To play the game of hurling. See Hurling.

 

© Webster 1913.


Hurl, n.

1.

The act of hurling or throwing with violence; a cast; a fling.

Congreve.

2.

Tumult; riot; hurly-burly.

[Obs.]

Knolles.

3. Hat Manuf.

A table on which fiber is stirred and mixed by beating with a bowspring.

 

© Webster 1913.

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