Haunts are one of the three main types of ghostly phenomena, as decided by parapsychologists. They combine elements of the other two types of ghosts: poltergeists and apparitions. Although they have been known to physically move objects, there seems to be intelligence at work. The movement isn't necessarily random or violent. Unlike an apparition, these ghosts can take notice of you, and may even speak.

A haunt includes the physical aspects of a poltergeist with the visual aspects of an apparition. They are said to be accompanied by the lowering of a room's temperature. Unlike apparitions or poltergeists, haunts have been known to verbally communicate with the people who witness them.

One of the most well-known types of a haunt is a wraith. A wraith (also called a crisis apparition) is the sudden and unexplainable appearance of a person who, at that moment, is really miles away. Wraiths most commonly appear when someone dies, is near death, or is in an accident. Contrary to popular belief, a wraith may be of a person who is still alive at the time. There have been numerous reports of people seeing their loved ones suddenly appear before learning that they died in a car accident. Wraiths might call for help, give a warning, leave a message, or simply say good-bye.

Haunt Haunting.] [F. hanter; of uncertain origin, perh. from an assumed LL. ambitare to go about, fr. L. ambire (see Ambition); or cf. Icel. heimta to demand, regain, akin to heim home (see Home). 36.]

1.

To frequent; to resort to frequently; to visit pertinaciously or intrusively; to intrude upon.

You wrong me, sir, thus still to haunt my house.
Shak.

Those cares that haunt the court and town.
Swift.

2.

To inhabit or frequent as a specter; to visit as a ghost or apparition.

Foul spirits haunt my resting place.
Fairfax.

3.

To practice; to devote one's self to.

[Obs.]

That other merchandise that men haunt with fraud . . . is cursed.
Chaucer.

Leave honest pleasure, and haunt no good pastime.
Ascham.

4.

To accustom; to habituate.

[Obs.]

Haunt thyself to pity.
Wyclif.

 

© Webster 1913.


Haunt, v. i.

To persist in staying or visiting.

I've charged thee not to haunt about my doors.
Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Haunt, n.

1.

A place to which one frequently resorts; as, drinking saloons are the haunts of tipplers; a den is the haunt of wild beasts.

In Old English the place occupied by any one as a dwelling or in his business was called a haunt.

Often used figuratively.

The household nook,
The haunt of all affections pure.
Keble.

The feeble soul, a haunt of fears.
Tennyson.

2.

The habit of resorting to a place.

[Obs.]

The haunt you have got about the courts.
Arbuthnot.

3.

Practice; skill.

[Obs.]

Of clothmaking she hadde such an haunt.
Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.

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