Gleam (?), v. i. [Cf. OE. glem birdlime, glue, phlegm, and E. englaimed.] Falconry

To disgorge filth, as a hawk.

 

© Webster 1913.


Gleam, n. [OE. glem, gleam, AS. glaem, prob. akin to E. glimmer, and perh. to Gr. warm, to warm. Cf. Glitter.]

1.

A shoot of light; a small stream of light; a beam; a ray; a glimpse.

Transient unexpected gleams of joi. Addison.

At last a gleam Of dawning light turned thitherward in haste His [Satan's] traveled steps. Milton.

A glimmer, and then a gleam of light. Longfellow.

2.

Brightness; splendor.

In the clear azure gleam the flocks are seen. Pope.

 

© Webster 1913.


Gleam, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gleamed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Gleaming.]

1.

To shoot, or dart, as rays of light; as, at the dawn, light gleams in the east.

2.

To shine; to cast light; to glitter.

Syn. -- To Gleam, Glimmer, Glitter. To gleam denotes a faint but distinct emission of light. To glimmer describes an indistinct and unsteady giving of light. To glitter imports a brightness that is intense, but varying. The morning light gleams upon the earth; a distant taper glimmers through the mist; a dewdrop glitters in the sun. See Flash.

 

© Webster 1913.


Gleam, v. t.

To shoot out (flashes of light, etc.).

Dying eyes gleamed forth their ashy lights. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.

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