A hand in poker involving having all cards as the same suit.
Also the condition of a face of someone embarassed or angry.
To drive from cover.
To make even.
flower key = F = flypage

flush v.

1. [common] To delete something, usually superfluous, or to abort an operation. "All that nonsense has been flushed." 2. [Unix/C] To force buffered I/O to disk, as with an fflush(3) call. This is not an abort or deletion as in sense 1, but a demand for early completion! 3. To leave at the end of a day's work (as opposed to leaving for a meal). "I'm going to flush now." "Time to flush." 4. To exclude someone from an activity, or to ignore a person.

`Flush' was standard ITS terminology for aborting an output operation; one spoke of the text that would have been printed, but was not, as having been flushed. It is speculated that this term arose from a vivid image of flushing unwanted characters by hosing down the internal output buffer, washing the characters away before they could be printed. The Unix/C usage, on the other hand, was propagated by the fflush(3) call in C's standard I/O library (though it is reported to have been in use among BLISS programmers at DEC and on Honeywell and IBM machines as far back as 1965). Unix/C hackers found the ITS usage confusing, and vice versa.

--The Jargon File version 4.3.1, ed. ESR, autonoded by rescdsk.

Flush (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Flushed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Flushing.] [Cf. OE. fluschen to fly up, penetrate, F. fluz a flowing, E. flux, dial. Sw. flossa to blaze, and E. flash; perh. influenced by blush. √84.]

1.

To flow and spread suddenly; to rush; as, blood flushes into the face.

The flushing noise of many waters.
Boyle.

It flushes violently out of the cock.
Mortimer.

2.

To become suddenly suffused, as the cheeks; to turn red; to blush.

3.

To snow red; to shine suddenly; to glow.

In her cheek, distemper flushing glowed.
Milton.

4.

To start up suddenly; to take wing as a bird.

Flushing from one spray unto another.
W. Browne.

 

© Webster 1913


Flush, v. t.

1.

To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water; as, to flush the meadows; to flood for the purpose of cleaning; as, to flush a sewer.

2.

To cause the blood to rush into (the face); to put to the blush, or to cause to glow with excitement.

Nor flush with shame the passing virgin's cheek.
Gay.

Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose,
Flushing his brow.
Keats.

3.

To make suddenly or temporarily red or rosy, as if suffused with blood.

How faintly flushed. how phantom fair,
Was Monte Rosa, hanging there!
Tennyson.

4.

To excite; to animate; to stir.

Such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition.
South.

5.

To cause to start, as a hunter a bird. Nares.

To flush a joints (Masonry), to fill them in; to point the level; to make them flush.

 

© Webster 1913


Flush, n.

1.

A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.

In manner of a wave or flush.
Ray.

2.

A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.

The flush of angered shame.
Tennyson.

3.

Any tinge of red color like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood; as, the flush on the side of a peach; the flush on the clouds at sunset.

4.

A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement. animation, etc.; as, a flush of joy.

5.

A flock of birds suddenly started up or flushed.

6. [From F. or Sp. flux. Cf. Flux.]

A hand of cards of the same suit.

 

© Webster 1913


Flush, a.

1.

Full of vigor; fresh; glowing; bright.

With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May.
Shak.

2.

Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.

Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
Arbuthnot.

3. (Arch. & Mech.)

Unbroken or even in surface; on a level with the adjacent surface; forming a continuous surface; as, a flush panel; a flush joint.

4. (Card Playing)

Consisting of cards of one suit.

Flush bolt.
(a) A screw bolt whose head is countersunk, so as to be flush with a surface.
(b) A sliding bolt let into the face or edge of a door, so as to be flush therewith. --
Flush deck. (Naut.) See under Deck, n., 1. --
Flush tank, a water tank which can be emptied rapidly for flushing drainpipes, etc.

 

© Webster 1913


Flush (?), adv.

So as to be level or even.

 

© Webster 1913


Flush, v. t.

To cause by flow; to draw water from, or pour it over or through (a pond, meadow, sewer, etc.); to cleanse by means of a rush of water.

 

© Webster 1913


Flush, v. i. (Mining)

(a)

To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of water is insufficient, by holding back the water, and releasing it periodically in a flood.

(b)

To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass.

 

© Webster 1913

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