1. To leave in the lurch; especially, to flee and abandon accomplices at a critical moment. 2. To get rid of; to dispose of anyone or anything that endangers one's security or proves annoying.

- american underworld dictionary - 1950

Ditch (?; 224), n.; pl. Ditches (#). [OE. dich, orig. the same word as dik. See Dike.]

1.

A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.

2.

Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ditch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ditched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Ditching.]

1.

To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches; as, to ditch moist land.

2.

To surround with a ditch.

Shak.

3.

To throw into a ditch; as, the engine was ditched and turned on its side.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ditch, v. i.

To dig a ditch or ditches.

Swift.

 

© Webster 1913.

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