Dis*sent" (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Dissented; p. pr. & vb. n. Dissenting.] [L. dissentire, dissentum; dis- + sentire to feel, think. See Sense.]

1.

To differ in opinion; to be of unlike or contrary sentiment; to disagree; -- followed by from.

The bill passed . . . without a dissenting voice. Hallam.

Opinions in which multitudes of men dissent from us. Addison.

2. Eccl.

To differ from an established church in regard to doctrines, rites, or government.

3.

To differ; to be of a contrary nature.

Hooker.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis*sent", n.

1.

The act of dissenting; difference of opinion; refusal to adopt something proposed; nonagreement, nonconcurrence, or disagreement.

The dissent of no small number [of peers] is frequently recorded. Hallam.

2. Eccl.

Separation from an established church, especially that of England; nonconformity.

It is the dissidence of dissent and the protestantism of the Protestant religion. Burke.

3.

Contrariety of nature; diversity in quality.

[Obs.]

The dissent of the metals. Bacon.

Syn. -- Disagreement; variance; difference; nonconcurrence; nonconformity.

 

© Webster 1913.

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