A negative mark or rank, generally acquired after having either done something poorly or after doing something that you weren't supposed to be doing at all. People acquire demerits for: running underwear up the flagpole; dying their hair; failing to do a shoulder check when merging; not fetching a stick thrown for one.

De*mer"it (?), n. [F. d'em'erite demerit (in sense 2), OF. demerite demerit (in sense 1), fr. L. demerere to deserve well, LL., to deserve well or ill; de- + merere to deserve. See De-, and Merit.]

1.

That which one merits or deserves, either of good or ill; desert.

[Obs.]

By many benefits and demerits whereby they obliged their adherents, [they] acquired this reputation. Holland.

2.

That which deserves blame; ill desert; a fault; a vice; misconduct; -- the opposite of merit.

They see no merit or demerit in any man or any action. Burke.

Secure, unless forfeited by any demerit or offense. Sir W. Temple.

3.

The state of one who deserves ill.

 

© Webster 1913.


De*mer"it, v. t. [Cf. F. d'em'eriter to deserve ill. See Demerit, n.]

1.

To deserve; -- said in reference to both praise and blame.

[Obs.]

If I have demerited any love or thanks. Udall.

Executed as a traitor . . . as he well demerited. State Trials (1645).

2.

To depreciate or cry down.

[R.]

Bp. Woolton.

 

© Webster 1913.


De*mer"it, v. i.

To deserve praise or blame.

 

© Webster 1913.

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