The embodiment of bad intentions. When a curse is placed on someone, that someone usually has bad luck, though it could be a specific curse, which will have drastic but limited effects (think Stephen King's Thinner). My ability to find bugs could be a blessing, but is also a curse.

Also, a slang word for obscene words, or for yelling at someone - also pronounced (and spelled in some cases) 'cuss'.

Curse (k?rs), v. t. [imp. & p.p. Cursed (k?rst) or Curst; p. pr. & vb. n. Cursing.] [AS. cursian, corsian, perh. of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. korse to make the sign of the cross, Sw. korsa, fr. Dan. & Sw. kors cross, Icel kross, all these Scand. words coming fr. OF. crois, croiz, fr. L. crux cross. Cf. Cross.]

1.

To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate evil upon; to execrate.

Thou shalt not . . . curse the ruler of thy people. Ex. xxii. 28.

Ere sunset I'll make thee curse the deed. Shak.

2.

To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.

On impious realms and barbarous kings impose Thy plagues, and curse 'em with such sons as those. Pope.

To curse by bell, book, and candle. See under Bell.

 

© Webster 1913.


Curse, v. i.

To utter imprecations or curses; to affirm or deny with imprecations; to swear.

Then began he to curse and to swear. Matt. xxi. 74.

His spirits hear me, And yet I need must curse. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Curse, n. [AS. curs. See Curse, v. t.]

1.

An invocation of, or prayer for, harm or injury; malediction.

Lady, you know no rules of charity, Which renders good for bad, blessings for curses. Shak.

2.

Evil pronounced or invoked upon another, solemnly, or in passion; subjection to, or sentence of, divine condemnation.

The priest shall write these curses in a book. Num. v. 23.

Curses, like chickens, come home to roost. Old Proverb.

3.

The cause of great harm, evil, or misfortune; that which brings evil or severe affliction; torment.

The common curse of mankind, folly and ignorance. Shak.

All that I eat, or drink, or shall beget, Is propagated curse. Milton.

The curse of Scotland Card Playing, the nine of diamonds. -- Not worth a curse. See under Cress.

Syn. -- Malediction; imprecation; execration. See Malediction.

 

© Webster 1913.

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