This is not an anti-meat node.

This node concerns the names we give different types of meat, and how we delude ourselves as to what it is we are eating (or more to the point, what it was, and how it got to be what it is).

We give many forms of meat names that don’t relate to the animal from which it came. Take for example beef. Beef is cow, there is no two ways about it. The only difference between cow and beef is that beef is dead. Yet I am the only person I know that calls a beef burger a cow burger.

This is important, as we are deluding our selves to the reality of what we are eating. A slice of pork was a living pig. It was kept in dirty confines it’s entire life, with the sole purpose of being slaughtered When this purpose was fulfilled, it was done so with mechanical efficiency, along with many other living breathing mammals.

Have you ever thought, while eating a beef rump steak, “wait a minute, this is a slab out of a cow’s arse”? Chances are you haven’t, but that’s the fact, and you should own up to the fact. It is then that you can examine whether you believe it is morally acceptable.

So why the fuss?

This is a relatively uncontroversial and simple example of how we can ignore how what we consume got to us. If we can accept that pork was in fact a living pig, then maybe we can start to think the same way about other things.

“Gee, I paid $100 for these shoes, yet the person who made them got paid 5 cents for their effort”

“Hell, a whole region of the world has been shat on for my petrol to be this cheap.”

It’s worth thinking about

Peasants and Invaders

The reason for many meats having a different name to the animal from which they are derived is one of early English culture.

During the 11th Century, after the Norman invasion, there were Anglo-Saxon peasants who would eat whatever they could - vegetables, berries - and would have to tend animals for the Norman invaders to eat.

The peasants would tend a pig (germanic word) and the Normans would eat pork (porc). The peasants would tend a sheep, but the Norman aristocrats would eat mutton (mouton).

Simple, when you know how!


Source:
http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Medieval_Studies/anglos.html

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