Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay
My, oh my, what a wonderful day
Plenty of sunshine headin' my way
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay

Mister Bluebird's on my shoulder
It's the truth, it's actual
Ev'rything is satisfactual
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay
Wonderful feeling, wonderful day, yes sir!

Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay
My, oh my, what a wonderful day
Plenty of sunshine headin' my way
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay

Mister Bluebird's on my shoulder
It's the truth, it's actual
Ev'rything is satisfactual
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay
Wonderful feeling, feeling this way

Mister Bluebird's on my shoulder
It is the truth, it's actual... huh?
Where is that bluebird? Mm-hm!
Ev'rything is satisfactual
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay
Wonderful feeling, wonderful day!

Accordian: T. Bone Wolk
Arranger: Lennie Niehaus
Bass: Buell Neidlinger
Drums: Jim Keltner
Electric Guitar: Arto Lindsay
Guitar: Fred Tackett
Guitar: Dennis Budimir
Orchestra Conductor: Lennie Niehaus
Percussion: Michael Blair
Piano: Terry Adams
Producer: Hal Willner
Producer: Van Dyke Parks
Publisher: Walt Disney Music Co.
Songwriter: Ray Gilbert
Songwriter: Allie Wrubel
Synthesizer: Peter Scherer
Vocals: Harry Nilsson
***The credits do not all refer to the original version of the song used in the movie
© 1945 Walt Disney Music Company


History of the Song:

As the beginning of World War II started, the Disney Studio's productions were put on a hold. The company’s hard work was put into making short films to support the war effort. However, Walt Disney didn't go right back to animated features right after the war. He was determined to make "package" films, which had more than one animated short put into one film. He also worked on live action films combined with animation. An example of a live action/animation package film was Song of the South that came out in 1946. There was music all throughout this time including the popular "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah”.

Walt Disney's delightful live-action feature film Song of the South had animated sequences and was based on the Uncle Remus stories by Joel Chandler Harris. The film was condemned by the NAACP in 1946 for "the impression it gives of an idyllic master-slave relationship". But the music was nominated for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture. Later in 1946, it received an Oscar for Best Song ("Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah") and an honorary Oscar to African-American James Baskett for his depiction of Uncle Remus. Other songs in the movie included "Uncle Remus Said," "How Do You Do?" and "Ev'rybody's Got a Laughing Place." The film was reissued in 1956, 1972, 1980, and 1986. Modern singers, such as the Jackson 5 and Paula Abdul also have recreated the song to fit their voices.

Sources:

http://www.harrynilsson.com/article1502.html

http://www.songofthesouth.net/movie/lyrics/zip-a-dee-doo-dah.html

www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Boulevard/1877/mushis.html+history+of+the+Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah&hl=en

This review was carefully checked by the CST_Group with regards to E2 FAQ: Copyrighted Material. It has been given a CST Approved tag.

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