Tum"ble (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Tumbled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Tumbling (?).] [OE. tumblen, AS. tumbian to turn heels over head, to dance violently; akin to D. tuimelen to fall, Sw. tumla, Dan. tumle, Icel. tumba; and cf. G. taumeln to reel, to stagger.]

1.

To roll over, or to and fro; to throw one's self about; as, a person in pain tumbles and tosses.

2.

To roll down; to fall suddenly and violently; to be precipitated; as, to tumble from a scaffold.

He who tumbles from a tower surely has a greater blow than he who slides from a molehill. South.

3.

To play tricks by various movements and contortions of the body; to perform the feats of an acrobat.

Rowe.

To tumble home Naut., to incline inward, as the sides of a vessel, above the bends or extreme breadth; -- used esp. in the phrase tumbling home. Cf. Wall-sided.

 

© Webster 1913.


Tum"ble, v. t.

1.

To turn over; to turn or throw about, as for examination or search; to roll or move in a rough, coarse, or unceremonious manner; to throw down or headlong; to precipitate; -- sometimes with over, about, etc.; as, to tumble books or papers.

2.

To disturb; to rumple; as, to tumble a bed.

 

© Webster 1913.


Tum"ble, n.

Act of tumbling, or rolling over; a fall.

 

© Webster 1913.

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