Re*dress" (r?*dr?s"), v. t. [Pref. re- + dress.]

To dress again.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*dress" (r?*dr?s"), v. t. [F. redresser to straighten; pref. re- re- + dresser to raise, arrange. See Dress.]

1.

To put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise.

[R.]

The common profit could she redress. Chaucer.

In yonder spring of roses intermixed With myrtle, find what to redress till noon. Milton.

Your wish that I should redress a certain paper which you had prepared. A. Hamilton.

2.

To set right, as a wrong; to repair, as an injury; to make amends for; to remedy; to relieve from.

Those wrongs, those bitter injuries, . . . I doubt not but with honor to redress. Shak.

3.

To make amends or compensation to; to relieve of anything unjust or oppressive; to bestow relief upon.

"'T is thine, O king! the afflicted to redress."

Dryden.

Will Gaul or Muscovite redress ye? Byron.

 

© Webster 1913.


Re*dress", n.

1.

The act of redressing; a making right; reformation; correction; amendment.

[R.]

Reformation of evil laws is commendable, but for us the more necessary is a speedy redress of ourselves. Hooker.

2.

A setting right, as of wrong, injury, or opression; as, the redress of grievances; hence, relief; remedy; reparation; indemnification.

Shak.

A few may complain without reason; but there is occasion for redress when the cry is universal. Davenant.

3.

One who, or that which, gives relief; a redresser.

Fair majesty, the refuge and redress Of those whom fate pursues and wants oppress. Dryden.

 

© Webster 1913.

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