Object Request Broker. A library (and a server) that let you use invoke object methods through a network via CORBA. They use the IIOP protocol to marshall the invocation thorugh the TCP/IP channel.

Some ORBs are:

In astrology an orb is the actual amount of degrees between two planets in an astrological chart.

A removable mass storage device, similar to a zip or jaz drive, made by Castlewood. An Orb drive comes in SCSI, EIDE, parallel, USB or FireWire, using 3.5" disks capable of storing 2.2GB, using magneto-optical technology. The major advantage of an Orb over, say, a Jaz drive, is the speed. An Orb has a sustained transfer rate of 12.2MB per second, compared to the Jaz drive's 8.7MB per second. An Orb drive is also much cheaper than a Jaz drive, and the media is about a quarter the cost of a Jaz drive.

Note that using a parallel port drive (of any sort) is much, much slower than using an IDE or SCSI version of the same drive.

Luminous spherical objects caught on film that are supposedly ghostly manifestations. Usually invisible to the naked eye, orbs tend only to appear using flash photography or a night vision lens. They are also easily faked.

Orb (?), n. [OF. orb blind, fr. L. orbus destitute.] Arch.

A blank window or panel

. [Obs.]

Oxf. Gloss.

 

© Webster 1913.


Orb, n. [F. orbe, fr. L. orbis circle, orb. Cf. Orbit.]

1.

A spherical body; a globe; especially, one of the celestial spheres; a sun, planet, or star.

In the small orb of one particular tear. Shak.

Whether the prime orb, Incredible how swift, had thither rolled. Milton.

2.

One of the azure transparent spheres conceived by the ancients to be inclosed one within another, and to carry the heavenly bodies in their revolutions.

3.

A circle; esp., a circle, or nearly circular orbit, described by the revolution of a heavenly body; an orbit.

The schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics, and epicycles, and such engines of orbs. Bacon.

You seem to me as Dian in her orb. Shak.

In orbs Of circuit inexpressible they stood, Orb within orb. Milton.

4.

A period of time marked off by the revolution of a heavenly body.

[R.]

Milton.

5.

The eye, as luminous and spherical.

[Poetic]

A drop serene hath quenched their orbs. Milton.

6.

A revolving circular body; a wheel.

[Poetic]

The orbs Of his fierce chariot rolled. Milton.

7.

A sphere of action.

[R.]

Wordsworth.

But in our orbs we'll live so round and safe. Shak

8.

Same as Mound, a ball or globe. See lst Mound.

9. Mil.

A body of soldiers drawn up in a circle, as for defense, esp. infantry to repel cavalry.

Syn. -- Globe; ball; sphere. See Globe.

 

© Webster 1913.


Orb (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Orbed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Orbing.]

1.

To form into an orb or circle.

[Poetic]

Milton. Lowell.

2.

To encircle; to surround; to inclose.

[Poetic]

The wheels were orbed with gold. Addison.

 

© Webster 1913.


Orb, v. i.

To become round like an orb.

[Poetic]

And orb into the perfect star. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.

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