It has also been theorized that the mammoths were forced into extinction by the retreating ice sheets of the last ice age as well as the improved hunting techniques of Cro-Magnon Man.

Also, Weyr is the evolved form of Ryu's Wyvern dragon form in Breath of Fire 4. Its attacks are:

Name               AP   Type    Lvl  Element     Effect
MeteorStrike       0    Breath       Earth       -----
Searing Sand       2    Melee        Earth       -----
Patoh              1    Magic   (1)  Earth       -----
Chi Patoh          2    Magic   (2)  Earth       -----
Patoh Pah          3    Magic   (3)  Earth       -----
Counter            1    Magic        -----       Auto-counter for 1 turn
Blitz              0    Melee        -----       Lose 25% HP

An apocryphal reason for the pauses in conversation that seem to every seven to twenty minutes or so. The story goes that early humans evolved to periodically be quiet so that they could listen for the approach of mammoths. Those people who kept babbling incessantly would be trampled by mammoths.

Occasionally people have been known to shout Mammoth! during those conversation pauses.

Pauses of this sort in conversations seem to occur when all conversation threads come to an end at the same time. Even conversations containing only highly gregarious people seem to enter these lulls.

Mam"moth (?), n. [Russ. mamont, m�xa0;mant, fr. Tartar mamma the earth. Certain Tartar races, the Tungooses and Yakoots, believed that the mammoth worked its way in the earth like a mole.] Zool.

An extinct, hairy, maned elephant (Elephas primigenius), of enormous size, remains of which are found in the northern parts of both continents. The last of the race, in Europe, were coeval with prehistoric man.

⇒ Several specimens have been found in Siberia preserved entire, with the flesh and hair remaining. They were imbedded in the ice cliffs at a remote period, and became exposed by the melting of the ice.

 

© Webster 1913.


Mam"moth (?), a.

Resembling the mammoth in size; very large; gigantic; as, a mammoth ox.

 

© Webster 1913.

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