Li*cen"ti*ate (?), n. [LL. licentiatus, fr. licentiare to allow to do anything, fr. L. licentia license. See License, n.]

1.

One who has a license to exercise a profession; as, a licentiate in medicine or theology.

The college of physicians, in July, 1687, published an edict, requiring all the fellows, candidates, and licentiates, to give gratuitous advice to the neighboring poor. Johnson.

2.

A friar authorized to receive confessions and grant absolution in all places, independently of the local clergy.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

3.

One who acts without restraint, or takes a liberty, as if having a license therefor.

[Obs.]

Bp. Hall.

4.

On the continent of Europe, a university degree intermediate between that of bachelor and that of doctor.

 

© Webster 1913.


Li*cen"ti*ate (?), v. t.

To give a license to.

[Obs.]

L'Estrange.

 

© Webster 1913.

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