ketch usually refers to a sailboat with a particular mast configuration:
  1. A mainmast somewhat forward of amidships, and
  2. A smaller mizzenmast just forward of the helm.
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Ketches are frequently confused with yawls; however, a yawl is a slightly smaller boat with its (smaller) mizzen aft of the helm.   Different designs of ketches have vertical stems or raked masts.

"Ketch" is a Dutch word; these boats are known in Scandinavia by "galeas".   They were used for centuries along the Northern Eurpoean coast as trading vessels.

Ketch (?), n. [Prob. corrupted fr. Turk. qaiq : cf. F. caiche. Cf. Caique.] Naut.

An almost obsolete form of vessel, with a mainmast and a mizzenmast, -- usually from one hundred to two hundred and fifty tons burden.

Bomb ketch. See under Bomb.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ketch, n.

A hangman. See Jack Ketch.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ketch, v. t. [See Catch.]

To catch.

[Now obs. in spelling, and colloq. in pronunciation.]

To ketch him at a vantage in his snares. Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.

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