Imperial March by John Williams, composed for the original motion picture soundtrack to the movie formerly known as The Empire Strikes Back, now Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. This tune is also known as: "Darth Vader's Theme," and "Imperial Death March." Here's my transcription of the London Symphony Orchestra performance on the soundtrack:

    Dum dum dig-i-da dum dig-i-dug-ig-i-dum
    Dum dum dig-i-da dum dig-i-dug-ig-i-dum
    Dum dum dum dum da dum dum da dum
    Dum dum dum dim da dum dum da dum
    Dum dum da dum dum da da-da-dum
    dum dum dum da da-da-dum
    dum dum dum da dum dum da dum
    Dum dum da dum dum da da-da-dum
    dum dum dum da da-da-dum
    dum dum dum da dum dum da dum

    (repeats many times)

    (ending)
    dum dum dig-i-da dig-i-da-dum
    dig-i-da-dig-i-da-dum
    dig-i-da dum dig-i-da-dum
    dig-i-da dum dig-i-da-dum

And critic Kathryn Kalinak had to say about this music that becomes Vader's leitmotif:

The basis of the melodic line is deceptively simple--an inverted spelling of a major triad. But the accompaniment, especially the strings, is predominantly minor, which confuses perception of the tonality. Even the way Williams chooses to spell out the triad confounds a clear major or minor tonality. Instead of spelling, or breaking down the triad into the conventional and familiar pattern of bottom note, middle note, and top note in the chord, Williams shuffles the pattern to middle note, bottom note, top note, with a return to the middle note once again. Thus instead of the expected intervals of an ascending major third, an ascending minor third (and an ascending fifth between the first and last notes of the chord), we hear a descending major third, an ascending fifth, and a descending minor third. The important part to remember here is that this arrangement works to make the melody sound minor even though it is actually major. (The interval of descending major third is the conventional way to begin the spelling of a descending minor chord.) Thus we're set up, in a sense, to expect minor, which colors our perception of the rest of the melody. It is interesting to speculate that Williams capitalized on that crucial descending major third from the original Vader motif in Star Wars, developing the new theme around it. (Descending major thirds also turn up in the woodwind and timpani parts in the new theme.) At any rate, it is surely a great irony that one of the most sinister and "minor"-sounding melodies in classical scoring is actually based on a major triad.

She said some other stuff, too, but there ain't room for it here.

Also, there are plenty of other recordings that sample or reference this tune (you can find those listed at Wikipedia, which fails to mention the 1999 CD of five different techno mixes by "D.V." which uses just the first 8 bars, available on Ultraviolet recordings).

Sources:
Kathryn Kalinak, "John Williams and 'The Empire' Strike Back", from Settling the Score: Music and the Classical Hollywood Film, University of Wisconsin Press, 1992.
Travers Cleeman, Review of "The Imperial March," The Soundtrack Retrospective, 20 September 1999, <http://www.alphalink.com.au/~tsr/imperialmarch.html> (June 7, 2000)
Christian Clemmenson, Review of "The Empire Strikes Back" Soundtrack, Filmtracks.com. February 20, 2005, <http://www.filmtracks.com/titles/empire.html> (July 23, 2007)
Wikipedia contributors, "The Imperial March," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Imperial_March&oldid=146326187 > (July 23, 2007).

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