Froth (?), n. [OE. frothe, Icel. fro[eth]a; akin to Dan. fraade, Sw. fradga, AS. afreo[eth]an to froth.]

1.

The bubbles caused in fluids or liquors by fermentation or agitation; spume; foam; esp., a spume of saliva caused by disease or nervous excitement.

2.

Any empty, senseless show of wit or eloquence; rhetoric without thought.

Johnson.

It was a long speech, but all froth. L'Estrange.

3.

Light, unsubstantial matter.

Tusser.

Froth insect Zool., the cuckoo spit or frog hopper; -- called also froth spit, froth worm, and froth fly. -- Froth spit. See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo.

 

© Webster 1913.


Froth, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Frothed (?); p. pr. & vb. n.. Frothing.]

1.

To cause to foam.

2.

To spit, vent, or eject, as froth.

He . . . froths treason at his mouth. Dryden.

Is your spleen frothed out, or have ye more? Tennyson.

3.

To cover with froth; as, a horse froths his chain.

 

© Webster 1913.


Froth, v. i.

To throw up or out spume, foam, or bubbles; to foam; as beer froths; a horse froths.

 

© Webster 1913.

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