Fool’s Gold

The Stone Roses

Gold road's sure a long road,
Winds on through the hills for fifteen days.
The pack on my back is aching,
The straps seem to cut me like a knife.

Gold road's sure a long road,
Winds on through the hills for fifteen days.
The pack on my back is aching,
The straps seem to cut me like a knife.

I'm no clown,
Don't want back down,
Don't need you to tell me what's going down,
Down, down, down, down, da-down down down
Down, down, down, down, da-down down down.

I'm standing alone,
I'm watching you all,
I'm seeing you sinking.
I'm standing alone,
You're weighing the gold,
I'm watching you sinking...
Fools Gold.

These boots weren't made for walking,
The Marquis de Sade never made no boots like these.
Gold's just around the corner,
Breakdown's coming up round the bend.
(What you doing? You've all gone mad)

Sometimes you have to try to get along dear,
I know the truth and I know what you're thinking.

Down, down, down, down, da-down down down.

I'm standing alone,
I'm watching you all,
I'm seeing you sinking.
I'm standing alone,
You're weighing the gold,
I'm watching you sinking...
Fools Gold...
Fools Gold...

I'm standing alone,
I'm watching you all,
I'm seeing you sinking.
I'm standing alone,
You're weighing the gold,
I'm watching you sinking...
Fools Gold...
Fools Gold...

A classic song by The Stone Roses, Fools Gold was a track that – whilst not on the British version of their first self-titled album – was an early hit for this Madchester band. It was written in 1989, with lyrics by Ian Brown and John Squire, and music by John Squire.

Oddly enough, it’s one of my favourite numbers by the Roses – odd because it’s a long way from their typical sound. Most of their earlier tracks (like Sally Cinnamon) were quite gritty, with laid back vocals, a style similar to that adopted by Oasis and the Verve. But this track was more of a dance number; I find it quite Happy Mondays-esque, though with the inimitable voice of Ian Brown giving it a unique sound.

In fact, as a song, it really experiences a wonderful synergy of the Roses’ talents: everyone is working overtime here, with the drums fast and distinctive, and John Squire playing very melodically on the guitar. The bassline here is quite astounding: bassist Mani really showed off what he could do.

An interesting fact, from StoneRoses.net:

For all it's critical acclaim and classic status though, it wasn't originally going to be the A-Side! That was going to be what is it's B-Side, What The World Is Waiting For, and the story goes that the Roses' press men send the tapes out with WTWIWF on the A-Side to the media, and got gushing reports back about the wonderful bass line. They listened to WTWIWF and wondered what all the fuss was about. Then they flipped the tape over and heard Fools Gold, and realised what had happened.

Source: www.stoneroses.net

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