English As She Is Spoke
Introduction to "The New Guide of the Conversation in Portuguese and English" | Useful Words, Part I | Useful Words, Part II | Familiar Phrases | Familiar Dialogues, Part I | Familiar Dialogues, Part II | Familiar Dialogues, Part III | Familiar Letters | Familiar Anecdotes | Idiotisms and Proverbs


Cuttler, a very rich man too many avaricious, commonly he was travel at a horse, and single for to avoid all expenses. In the evening at to arrive at the inn did feign to be indispose, to the end that one bring him the supper. He did ordered the stable knave to bring in their room some straw, for to put in their boots he made to warm her bed and was go lo sleep. When the servant was draw again, he come up again, and with the straw of their boots, and the candle what was leave him he made a small fire where he was roast a herring what he did keep of her pocket. He was always the precaution one to provide him self of a small of bread and one bring up a water bottle, and thus with a little money.
A blind did hide five hundred crowns in a corner of their garden; but a neighbour, which was perceive it, did dig up and took its. The blind not finding more her money, was suspect that might be robed, but one work for take again it? He was going find the neighbour, and told him that he came to get him a council; than he was a thousand crowns which the half was hided into a sure part and I don't know if want, if to put the remains to the same part. The neighbour was council him so and was hasten to carry back that sum, in the hope soon to draw out a thousand. But the blind having finded the money, was seized it, having called her neighbour, he told him: "Gossip, the blind saw clearer than this that may have two eyes."
A man one's was presented at a magistrate which had a considerable library. "What you make?" beg him the magistrate. "I do some books," he was answered. "But any of your books I did not seen its.--I believe it so, was answered the author; I mak nothign for Paris. From a of my works is imprinted, I send the edition for America; I don't compose what to colonies."
One eyed was laied against a man which had good eyes that he saw better than him. "I had gain, over said the one eyed; why I see you two eyes, and you not look me who one."
A english lord was in their bed tormented, cruelly of the gout, when was announced him a pretended physician, which had a remedy sure against that illness. "That doctor came in coach or on foot?" was request the lord. "On foot," was answered him the servant. "Well, was replied the sick, go tell to the knave what go back one's self, because if he was the remedy, which he exalt him self, he should roll a coach at six horses, and I would be send for him my self and to offer him the half part of my lands for to be delivered of my sickness."
A duchess accused of magic being interrogated for a commissary extremely unhandsome, this was beg him selve one she had look the devil. "Yes, sir, I did see him," was answer the duchess, "and he was like you as two water's drops."
A Lady, which was to dine, chid to her servant that she not had used butter enough. This girl, for to excuse him selve, was bing a little cat on the hand, and told that she came to take im in the crime, finishing to eat the two pounds from butter who remain. The Lady took immediately the cat, was put into the balances it had not weighted that one an half pound.
A countryman which came through to Paris upon the bridge to the change, not had perceived merchandises in several shops. The curiosity take him, he come near of a exchange desk:--"Sir," had he beg from a look simple, "tell me what you sell." The loader though that he may to divert of the personage:--"I sell," was answered him, "asse's heads."--"Indeed," reply to him the countryman, "you make of it a great sale, because it not remains more but one in your shop."
The commander Forbin of janson, being at a repast with a celebrated Boileau, had undertaken to pun him upon her name:--"What name," told him, "carry you thither? Boileau: I would wish better to call me Drink wine." The poet was answered him in the same tune:--"And you, sir, what name have you choice? Janson: I should prefer to be named John-Meal. The meal don't is valuable better than the furfur?"
A physician eighty years of age had enjoied of a health unalterable. Theirs friends did him of it compliments every days: "Mister doctor," they said to him, "you are admirable man. What you make then for to bear you as well?"--"I shall tell you it, gentleman," he was answered them, "and I exhort you in same time at to follow my exemple. I live of the product of my ordering without take any remedy who I command to my sicks."
A countryman was confessed to the parson to have robbed a mutton at a farmer of her neighbourhood. "My friend," told him the confessor, "it must to return, or you shall not have the absolution."--But repply the villager, "I had eated him."--"So much worse," told him the pastor, "you vill be the devil sharing; because in the wide vale where me ought to appear we before God every one shall spoken against you, even the mutton." "How!" repply the countryman, "the mutton will find in that part? I am very glad of that; then the restitution shall be easy, since I shall not have to tell to the farmer: 'Neighbor take your mutton again.'"
Plato walking one's self a day to the field with some of their friends. They were to see him Diogenes who was in to water untill the chin. The superficies of the water was snowed, for the reserve of the hole that Diogenes was made. "Don't look it more," told them Plato, "and he shall get out soon."
A day came a man consult this philosopher for to know at o'clock it was owe to eat. "If thou art rich," told him, "eat when you shall wish; if you are poor, when you may do."
At the middle of a night very dark, a blind was walk in the streets with a light on the hand and a full jar upon his back. Some one which ran do meet him, and surprised at that light: "Simple that you are," told him, "what serve you this light? The night and the day are not them the same thing by you!"--"It is not for me," was answering the blind, "that I bring this light, it is to the and that the giddie swhich seem to you do not come to run against me, and make to break my jar."

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