The Original

I. According to The Random House Dictionary of the English Language (the 2000 page edition):

Di-xie, (dik 'sé) n. 1. Also called Dixieland, Dixie Land, {emp. mine} the southern States of the United States, esp. those that were formally part of the Confederacy. 2. Any of several songs with this name, esp. the minstrel song (1859) by D. D. Emmett, popular as a Confederate war song. --adj. 3. of, from, or characteristic of the southern States of the United States. 4. a girl's given name. [? (MASON -DIX(ON LINE) + - IE]

II, Submitted here are the original lyrics to Daniel D. Emmett's song, Dixie Land. It probably was made the most famous in Elvis Presley's medley: "Trilogy," (which includes the "Battle Hymn of the Republic, and "Hush Little Baby, (don't you cry)." At the top left of the page is noted, Allegretto ( And it must be noted these words contain the spelling recorded exactly the same as the sheet music, Source: Sing Sociability Songs for Camps - Homes - Communties and Schools, (Keep America Singing) 1928:

1. I wish I was in the land ob cotton,
Old times dar am not forgotten,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
In Dixie Land whar' I was born in,
Early on one frosty mornin',
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

(Chorus)

Den I wish I was in Dixie Hooray! Hooray!
In Dixie Land, I'll take my stand
To lib an' die in Dixie;
Away, Away, Away down south in Dixie;
Away, Away, Away down south in Dixie.

2. Old Misus marry Will, de weaber,
Willium was a gay deceaber,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
But when he put his arm around 'er
He smil'd as fierce as a forty pounder,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

(Chorus)

3. his face was sharp as a butcher's cleaber,
But dat did not seem to greaber
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.
Old Misus acted the foolish part,
And died for a man dat broke her heart,
Look away! Look away! Look away! Dixie Land.

(Chorus)

Lexicon:

b = v
d = th

On a personal note: I always was a Unionist, but just like the "Black Avenger," Ken Hamblin, a conservative black radio talk show host who feels for the South, (playing this song everytime a caller on his show is from Dixie. This version too, is the way it was intended, so bucolic. Even though my father's people were Yankees, my mother's folks were from Georgia and Texas, and I get a stirring from this song, especially played slowly and with a blues feeling.

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