Country music group that formed in 1989. Original members were Emily Erwin (now Emily Robison), Martie Erwin (now Martie Seidel), Robin Lynn Macy, and Laura Lynch.

They released three albums on independent labels. Macy left after the second release and Lynch left after the third.

Natalie Maines joined the group in 1995. Shortly after she joined, their career took off.

They released Wide Open Spaces in 1998 and Fly in 1999. Both have gone platinum.

In America it is one thing for a rock band to make controversial remarks, but it is another for a country music band to do the same. The Dixie chicks, fresh off yet another Grammy performance, found themselves in the middle of a huge public relations fiaso in March of this year. While touring in Europe a number of quotes were attributed to various members of the trio, most of them derogatory with regards to President George Bush and the impending conflict with Iraq.

One such quote, which may or may not have been spoken:

"Just so you know, we're ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas."

Leading some credence to these reports was a formal apology sent out by the lead singer of the band,Natalie Maines, on March 14th.

While these events pale next to John Lennon and his famous "We're bigger than Jesus Christ" statement during the heigth of Beatlemania, the reaction of both country music fans and radio stations has been similar. Fans have staged massive CD buring parties and radio stations throughout the country have now boycotted the playing of any of their music.

Understand this band was as huge as any musical group could be in the United States. Their last three CDs have all gone platinum in sales (including Home, which won the award mentioned above). Internet ticket sales for an upcoming concert tour set records for one day presales in February of this year. It remains to be seen if the expected requests for refunds will be allowed.

some information from associated
ticketmaster. com

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