Craze (krAz), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Crazed (krAzd); p. pr. & vb. n. Crazing.] [OE. crasen to break, fr. Scand., perh. through OF.; cf. Sw. krasa to crackle, slå i kras, to break to pieces, F. écraser to crush, fr. the Scand. Cf. Crash.]

1.

To break into pieces; to crush; to grind to powder. See Crase.

God, looking forth, will trouble all his host, And craze their chariot wheels.
Milton.

2.

To weaken; to impair; to render decrepit. [Obs.]

Till length of years,
And sedentary numbness, craze my limbs.
Milton.

3.

To derange the intellect of; to render insane.

Any man . . . that is crazed and out of his wits.
Tilloston.

Grief hath crazed my wits.
Shak.

 

© Webster 1913


Craze, v. i.

1.

To be crazed, or to act or appear as one that is crazed; to rave; to become insane.

She would weep and he would craze.
Keats.

2.

To crack, as the glazing of porcelain or pottery.

 

© Webster 1913


Craze, n.

1.

Craziness; insanity.

2.

A strong habitual desire or fancy; a crotchet.

It was quite a craze with him [Burns] to have his Jean dressed genteelly.
Prof. Wilson.

3.

A temporary passion or infatuation, as for same new amusement, pursuit, or fashion; as, the bric-a-brac craze; the æsthetic craze.

Various crazes concerning health and disease.
W. Pater.

 

© Webster 1913


Craze, n. (Ceramics)

A crack in the glaze or enamel such as is caused by exposure of the pottery to great or irregular heat.

 

© Webster 1913

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.