Coy (koi), a. [OE. coi quiet, still, OF. coi, coit, fr.L. quietus quiet, p. p. of quiescere to rest, quie rest; prob. akin to E. while. See While, and cf. Quiet, Quit, Quite.]

1.

Quiet; still.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

2.

Shrinking from approach or familiarity; reserved; bashful; shy; modest; -- usually applied to women, sometimes with an implication of coquetry.

Coy, and difficult to win.
Cowper.

Coy and furtive graces.
W. Irving.

Nor the coy maid, half willings to be pressed,
Shall kiss the cup, to pass it to the rest.
Goldsmith.

3.

Soft; gentle; hesitating.

Enforced hate,
Instead of love's coy touch, shall rudely tear thee.
Shak.

Syn. -- Shy; shriking; reserved; modest; bashful; backward; distant.

© Webster 1913.


Coy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Coyed (koid); p. pr. & vb. n. Coying.]

1.

To allure; to entice; to decoy.

[Obs.]

A wiser generation, who have the art to coy the fonder sort into their nets.
Bp. Rainbow.

2.

To caress with the hand; to stroke.

Come sit thee down upon this flowery bed,
While I thy amiable cheeks do coy.
Shak.

© Webster 1913.


Coy, v. i.

1.

To behave with reserve or coyness; to shrink from approach or familiarity.

[Obs.]

Thus to coy it,
With one who knows you too!
Rowe.

2.

To make difficulty; to be unwilling.

[Obs.]

If he coyed
To hear Cominius speak, I 'll keep at home.
Shak.

© Webster 1913.

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