A radio station format that plays "fine art" music, often including opera, theater, and/or culture-oriented news and talk. Many NPR stations fall into this category.

Source: The M Street Radio Directory, 1996 Edition

Clas"sic (?), Clas"sic*al (?), a. [L. classicus relating to the classes of the Roman people, and especially to the frist class; hence, of the first rank, superior, from classis class: cf. F. classique. See Class, n.]

1.

Of or relating to the first class or rank, especially in literature or art.

Give, as thy last memorial to the age, One classic drama, and reform the stage. Byron.

Mr. Greaves may justly be reckoned a classical author on this subject [Roman weights and coins]. Arbuthnot.

2.

Of or pertaining to the ancient Greeks and Romans, esp. to Greek or Roman authors of the highest rank, or of the period when their best literature was produced; of or pertaining to places inhabited by the ancient Greeks and Romans, or rendered famous by their deeds.

Though throned midst Latium's classic plains. Mrs. Hemans.

The epithet classical, as applied to ancient authors, is determined less by the purity of their style than by the period at which they wrote. Brande & C.

He [Atterbury] directed the classical studies of the undergraduates of his college. Macaulay.

3.

Conforming to the best authority in literature and art; chaste; pure; refined; as, a classical style.

Classical, provincial, and national synods. Macaulay.

Classicals orders. Arch. See under Order.

 

© Webster 1913.

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