Cap"tive (?), n. [L. captivus, fr. capere to take: cf. F. captif. See Caitiff.]

1.

A prisoner taken by force or stratagem, esp., by an enemy, in war; one kept in bondage or in the power of another.

Then, when I am thy captive, talk of chains. Milton.

2.

One charmed or subdued by beaty, excellence, or affection; one who is captivated.

 

© Webster 1913.


Cap"tive, a.

1.

Made prisoner, especially in war; held in bondage or in confinement.

A poor, miserable, captive thrall. Milton.

2.

Subdued by love; charmed; captivated.

Even in so short a space, my wonan's heart Grossly grew captive to his honey words. Shak.

3.

Of or pertaining to bondage or confinement; serving to confine; as, captive chains; captive hours.

 

© Webster 1913.


Cap"tive (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Captived (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Captiving.]

To take prisoner; to capture.

Their inhabitans slaughtered and captived. Burke.

 

© Webster 1913.

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