The secret method by which Cadbury gets liquid substances into segmented chocolate bars. They pour liquid chocholate into inverted molds and cool the bottom (what will become the top) until it is solid while leaving the rest molten. drops of the liquid are placed on the still molten back and sink in leaving small swirl marks. finaly the entire thing is cooled and you have a Caramilk bar or one of its kin.

\ / \__Mold
 ~  /

... --Molten Chocolate

### --Solid Chocolate

*** --Filling

\............/
 \........../
  \......../
   ~~~~~~~~

\............/
 \........../
  \########/
   ~~~~~~~~

\............/
 \...****.../
  \########/
   ~~~~~~~~

\############/
 \###****###/
  \########/
   ~~~~~~~~ 
I'm not sure if yours is a theory or the real way they do it, but I believe I have a much simpler theoretical method:

They build them right-side-up. Start with a flat chocolate base, then place a frozen chunk of the caramel in the middle of it, then put an open-topped mold over top and pour on the molten chocolate. The molten chocolate will slowly thaw the caramel out, and the frozen caramel will speed up the solidification of the chocolate. The Cadbury label can be stamped on shortly after.

Using the legend from the post above:

1.

   #######

2.
     ***
   #######

3.  /   \
   / *** \
   #######

4.  /...\
   /.***.\
   #######

5.  /###\
   /#***#\
   #######

And that is my theory on how they get the caramel into Cadbury's Caramilk Candy.

Apparatus

  • (1)Freezer
  • (1)Stove
  • (1)Appropriate Chocolate Mold
  • Plastic Wrap
  • (2) Pots
  • (1) Icing knife
  • (1) Hair Dryer

Ingredients

Note : This is only meant to describe the procedure, and not the actual recipe. I have neither made this myself, nor do I have a recipe for it. I did learn the technique at a course I took at the Cordon Bleu a couple of years ago, though I haven't made use of the knowledge until now.

Procedure

  1. Heat the mold to 85F. This will make sure that the temper of the chocolate is preserved.
  2. Heat your chocolate to proper temperature (~85-90F).
  3. Pour a generous amount of chocolate into the mold. Let it sit for a short while. Tap the mould from all sides with the knife to bring any air bubbles to the top. Then turn it upside down and swirl and tap it. Clean off the counter. ( Next time, make sure you've got the mold over the pot of melted chocolate). Swirling creates a consistently thick shell. The longer it sits, the thicker the shell.
  4. Cover with wrap - put in freezer to cool.
  5. Heat the caramel so it is soft. Let it cool to 80F, and thin it with the syrup. This is so that it can be poured without melting the existing chocolate.
  6. Remove the mold from the freezer. Scrape the excess chocolate away, such that there is no chocolate left above the cups.
  7. Carefully pour the caramel into the chocolate cups. It will take practice to determine how much is just right.
  8. Tap to remove bubbles and to level the caramel, cover and return to freezer.
  9. Once a skin has formed on the caramel, remove from freezer. With the hair drier, heat the chocolate so that it is slightly soft, but be careful not to melt the skin of the caramel, we do not want the chocolate to mix with it. Likewise we don't want to ruin the temper of the chocolate. The heating allows the bottom to bond with the top (cups) and prevents leaks.
  10. Flood the mold with chocolate to form the bottom of the bar. Scrape the excess off with the icing knife. Tap to remove air bubbles.
  11. Cover and return to freezer.

Once it is set, remove from freezer, and then push the bar from the molding. When the bar returns to room temperature, the caramel should be nice and soft again inside.

Enjoy!

I suggested Maple Syrup as a thinner for the caramel because it smells right. Experiment with other agents to thin the caramel to get the right taste and texture.

This is quite likely the procedure they follow, although on a larger scale and automated. The recipe is something else.

For bars with droplets of caramel interspersed within:

A caramel that is very rich and gooey at room temperature is used along with a chocolate that is solid at room temperature. Droplets of this caramel are frozen. The chocolate portion of the bar is made in two halves (This is why there is a visible seam on the side of these bars). The mold is filled halfway with melted chocolate. The frozen drops of caramel are placed on this layer, then the second layer of chocolate is quickly added. The bar is then brought to room temperature, hardening the chocolate and returning the caramel to it's gooey state.
Source: http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Cadbury%20Caramilk (pop-up hell site, beware)


For bars completely filled with caramel:

The best way to explain is to give the source (which is illustrated) up front:
http://www3.ns.sympatico.ca/mt-edward/cadbury.htm
These bars are typically made by use of a shell molding technique. Simply put, the topside of the candy bar is made by coating the bottom of a candy mold with chocolate. The filling is added, then the chocolate that forms the bottom of the candy bar is poured on top of this inverted confection.

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