Bark (bärk), n. [Akin to Dan. & Sw. bark, Icel. börkr, LG. & HG. borke.]

1.

The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.

2.

Specifically, Peruvian bark.

Bark bed. See Bark stove (below). --
Bark pit, a pit filled with bark and water, in which hides are steeped in tanning. --
Bark stove (Hort.), a glazed structure for keeping tropical plants, having a bed of tanner's bark (called a bark bed) or other fermentable matter which produces a moist heat.

 

© Webster 1913


Bark, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Barked (bärkt); p. pr. & vb. n. Barking.]

1.

To strip the bark from; to peel.

2.

To abrade or rub off any outer covering from; as to bark one's heel.

3.

To girdle. See Girdle, v. t., 3.

4.

To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark; as, to bark the roof of a hut.

 

© Webster 1913


Bark, v. i. [OE. berken, AS. beorcan; akin to Icel. berkja, and prob. to E. break.]

1.

To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs; -- said of some animals, but especially of dogs.

2.

To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.

They bark, and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
Tyndale.

Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed.
Fuller.

 

© Webster 1913


Bark, n.

The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog; a similar sound made by some other animals.

 

© Webster 1913


Bark, Barque (&?;), n. [F. barque, fr. Sp. or It. barca, fr. LL. barca for barica. See Barge.]

1.

Formerly, any small sailing vessel, as a pinnace, fishing smack, etc.; also, a rowing boat; a barge. Now applied poetically to a sailing vessel or boat of any kind. Byron.

2. (Naut.)

A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner- rigged.

 

© Webster 1913

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