The 1995 Sunsoft-produced sequel to Aero the Acrobat for the Super NES and the Sega Genesis, with a Game Boy Advance version scheduled for release sometime in 2004. It improved upon some of the first game's failings and added some much needed improvements, such as a password system and well-animated character sprites. The music has also been pumped up, with none of the tunes from the previous game returning for an encore. Also listen out for some digitized "Wow!"s and "Yipe!"s from our hero.

The game begins immediately after the conclusion of the first one as Aero stumbles into a magic box left in Edgar Ektor's museum and finds himself in a magical world composed of a castle, snowboard range, Russian citadel, disco-inspired instrument world (strikingly similar to a level in Bubsy 2), performer dungeon, and Edgar Ektor's deathtrain. It's up to Aero to put a stop to Edgar's evil plans to ruin the circus once again.

All of Aero's moves from the first game are back plus he's picked up a few new ones, such as a downward drill-attack and the ability to slide down ladders. He's lost, however, the power to hover at will. The usual items are back, too. Watch out for stars and snack treats that are worth points at the end of the level. Aero should also collect the letters A-E-R-O in each level to play a guessing game bonus level hosted by Ektor himself that could win our hero a 1-up or points. Unlike the first game, this time around every level has the same objective: reach the end of the level. There are no special goals that must be accomplished, Aero must simply make his way to the magic door at the end of the level and jump inside it. However, this shouldn't deter him from snooping around and looking for secret rooms and hidden items. By removing the specialized objectives from the first game, Sunsoft has cranked down the difficulty of the series slightly. Plus the password system is a big help as well.

If you enjoyed the first game I highly recommend picking up this one and giving it a try. It was quite hard to find during its initial release (I finally found it while on vacation in a little backwoods shopping mall in Georgia) and chances are it's still just as rare, but it couldn't hurt to check the usual used game shops and online auctions.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.