Master Sargent Robin J. Rosenberger served in the United States Air Force in medical airlift missions and as an Air Force historian. Prior to September 11, 2001, he was one of the first "Information Warfare crew chiefs."1 After September 11th, he served a tour of duty in Iraq to reprise his role in medical airlift. He created the Computer Virus Myths database originally hosted at and later moved to in 2000.

Described as "The Dennis Miller of cybersecurity," Rosenberger is one of the most feared critics of the anti-virus industry. He gained this reputation by pointing out the absurdity of the addictive update model and the United States Military's reliance on inferior computer security technology, among other things. Given his Air Force service record, his criticism of US Military computing practices carries considerable weight.

Criticized himself as an unabashed fan of Microsoft2, he's been accused of letting Microsoft write his articles.3 Most of his critics happen to be "other" computer security people whom, in his opinion, take their jobs way too seriously:

Rob, the time for criticism is over. Everything changed after September 11th.

Yeah. Everything in computer security changed when terrorists... finally learned how to pilot an aircraft. My goodness! If terrorists can use Microsoft Flight Simulator, what else can they do that we don't know about?!!!

Say what you will about his sense of humour. Rosenberger uses that humour as a weapon against the computer security fearmongers. He makes you laugh at them, and opens your eyes to the absurdities they represent in the process.

-----Original Message-----
From: Rob Rosenberger (
Sent: Monday, November 15, 2004 13:51
To: Gordon Fecyk
Subject: RE: "Cyber Enemies" list?

Oh, I see what you mean now! {bonk} I have full authority to let you to use any of our copyrighted material on Go for it!

Rob Rosenberger, editor