The Millennium Bridge is London, UK, first new Thames crossing since Tower Bridge (which was openned in 1894). Designed by Normal Foster as a "blade of light" across the river, the new bridge was "dedicated" by Queen Elizabeth II on May 9, 2000. It openned to the public on Saturday, June 10, 2000.

I've had the privilege of seeing it grow day by day, as I cross the river by Southwark Bridge. It's truely majestic. It's lightness and clean lines contrast starkly with the heavy, industrial bridges either side (Blackfriars Bridge being the other).

Unfortunately, on the openning day, the bridge was struck by bad news. People taking part in the openning walk complained about how much the structure swayed. From the BBC news site (http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/uk/newsid_784000/784927.stm):

Engineers made safety checks to the structure after it was forced to close briefly. A limit was subsequently imposed on the number of pedestrians allowed to cross the bridge.

The engineers stated that the bridge was structurally safe but the owners (the Millennium Bridge Trust) put crowd control measures in place to keep numbers down. As a spokesman for the engineers pointed out, "The bridge is intended to have some movement. It's a suspension bridge - if there isn't movement there can be a problem."

I'll quote further from the BBC:

Those who had made it across before the closure said they had been surprised by the swaying sensation.

Margaret Vint, 60, from Burnham, Buckinghamshire, said: "I think you need to take your sea sickness pills before crossing.

"The vibration was tremendous - I could feel the whole weight of the bridge swaying."

The bridge was closed on Monday night.

Personally, I think it's very sad. The structure is designed to move. Perhaps it moves more than some expected. However, so long as it's safe - i.e. not going to throw anyone to their feet (or over the side!) - I can't see why it should be closed. When it comes down to it, it's too beautiful to fail, just like the London Eye.

There's a good webcab (http://www.mbridge.ft.com/hifat/index.html).