Return to mutiny (definition)

Mu"ti*ny (?), n.; pl. Mutinies (#). [From mutine to mutiny, fr. F. se mutiner, fr. F. mutin stubborn, mutinous, fr. OF. meute riot, LL. movita, fr. movitus, for L. motus, p.p. of movere to move. See [Move].]

1.

Insurrection against constituted authority, particularly military or naval authority; concerted revolt against the rules of discipline or the lawful commands of a superior officer; hence, generally, forcible resistance to rightful authority; insubordination.

In every mutiny against the discipline of the college, he was the ringleader. Macaulay.

2.

Violent commotion; tumult; strife.

[Obs.]

o raise a mutiny betwixt yourselves. Shak.

[Mutiny act] [Law], an English statute reenacted annually to punish mutiny and desertion.

Wharton.

Syn. -- See [Insurrection].

 

© [Webster 1913].


Mu"ti*ny, v. i. [imp. & p. p. [Mutinied] (?); p. pr. & vb. n. [Mutinying] (?).]

1.

To rise against, or refuse to obey, lawful authority in military or naval service; to excite, or to be guilty of, mutiny or mutinous conduct; to revolt against one's superior officer, or any rightful authority.

2.

To fall into strifle; to quarrel.

[Obs.]

Shak.

 

© [Webster 1913].

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