_________________________________________________________________________________________
 |  |    |  \ | /  |   |    \ | / | |  /    |  |     |  |    |  \ | /   |   |    |   |  
/|  |\   |/  \|/  /|   |  o  \|/  | | /  o  |  |  o /|  |\   |/  \|/  o | o |    |  /| o
_|_ |/   |/   |   _|_ _|_     |   | |/     _|_ |__  _|_ |/   |/   |     |   |__  | / |  
 |  |   /|    |    |   |      |   | |       |  |     |  |   /|    |     |   |   /|   |  
 |  |\  /|    |    |   |  o   |   | |    o  |  |  o  |  |\  /|    |   o | o |  / |   | o
 |  | \  |    |    |   |      |   | |       |  |     |  | \  |    |     |   |    |   |  
¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
____________________________________________________________________________
|  \ | /   |    |  |  | | |     | | |    |   |   |   | | |   | |  |    |   
|\  \|/  o |  . |  |\ | | | o   | | | o  |   |\  |\  | | | o | /  |    |\ o
| \  |     | /| | _|_ | / |   __| | /  __|__ |/  | \ | | /   |/ __|__ _|_  
| |  |     |/ | |  |  |/  |   __| |/     |   |   |   | |/    |    |    |   
| |  |   o '  | |  |  |   | o   | |   o  |   |\  |   | |   o |\   |    |  o
| |  |        | |  |  |   |     | |      |   | \ |   | |     | \  |    |   
¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

The runes above is a piece of a Danish traditional ballad (folkevise), written on the last page of the Codex Runicus manuscript of circa 1300 AD.  The Codex Runicus contains the Code of Scania and other ancient Danish laws, but the song appears unrelated to the preceding text.

The song is transliterated to Drømde mik en drøm i nat um silki ok ærlik pæl.”  The popular translation into modern Danish is Drømte mig en drøm i nat om silke og ærlig pels” which in English would be “Dreamed me a dream last night of silk and noble fur.”

The particular significance of this song is, that it is written with its notes, and it is the oldest piece of traditional music preserved in the history of Denmark:

    mi   so    fa   so     mi   re do
Drømde mik en drøm i nat

 mi    so   so   so mi   do
um silki ok ærlik pæl

The melody is particularly well known by the older generations in Denmark, as it was used as the pause signal of the national broadcast radio.


See the runes and listen to the melody:
www.hum.ku.dk/ami/28-100r-dt.html